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Financial Aid

Robert Noyce Scholars Program
Preparing Quality Math and Science Teachers for High-Need Schools
The University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education offers a new Robert Noyce Scholars Program, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded program, for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and professionals to encourage qualified individuals to become effective science and mathematics teachers and to expand the number of highly qualified teachers serving highneed school districts.

The Warner School continues to broaden its impact and collaborative partnerships with area schools and educators to help impact the learning opportunities offered to students in high-need schools. The new Warner Noyce Scholars Program responds to the critical need for highly-qualified STEM majors and professionals to pursue teaching careers in the nation’s neediest schools. Through this program, we seek to attract, prepare, and increase the number of certified math and science secondary teachers who are committed to and well-prepared for serving students in high-need school districts, with a particular focus on supporting the Rochester City School District.

The Warner Noyce Scholars Program provides graduate students with an affordable high-quality way to obtain a master’s degree and New York State certification to teach mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, or earth science in grades 7-12. All Noyce scholars will enroll tuition-free into one of the Warner School’s graduate teacher preparation programs in mathematics or science. As part of fulfilling the scholarship’s service requirements, scholars make a commitment to teach for at least two years in a high need school district within six years following the completion of their master’s program.

The scholarship program was developed in partnership with the Rochester City School District and the Rochester Area Colleges for Excellence in Math and Science, a state-funded collaboration of 19 area colleges that are committed to increasing the local and national pool of mathematics and science teachers.
 

Program Benefits
Noyce scholars attend Warner School’s teacher preparation program effectively tuition-free. The program, which will award scholarships to approximately 9 highly-qualified STEM majors and professionals per academic year for a total of three years, provides an incentive for talented undergraduates and professionals considering a career change to work as math and science teachers in high-need school districts.

In response to a national shortage of qualified math and science teachers, the Warner School, through its Noyce Scholars Program, aims to boost its efforts in producing teachers better trained in mathematics and science to teach it. The Noyce Scholarship program will help address this shortage by giving talented and enthusiastic students and career changers, alike, the opportunity to become leaders in mathematics and science education and to improve the learning opportunities offered to all students in schools where there is a shortage or a need.

At the Warner School, we do not just prepare teachers to survive in today’s schools; our graduate students are reflective practitioners who aspire to make a difference, to motivate thinking, and to transform lives.

Our programs in math and science prepare teachers to understand that learning is more than simply memorizing the facts and procedures and to make mathematics and science meaningful and relevant to students. These programs prepare a new generation of reform-minded teachers entering the classrooms in future years, resulting in higher quality science and math education in our country.

All Noyce Scholars will participate in Warner’s high quality and innovative teacher preparation programs leading to teaching certification in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, or earth science. By providing a solid theoretical grounding and concrete experiences to develop inquiry-based teaching practices specific to mathematics and science, Noyce scholars learn how to approach curricular and pedagogical decisions as thoughtful practitioners, with a deep understanding of math and science and the best practices and methods for teaching.

After graduation, Noyce scholars will receive ongoing support during their first two years of teaching through monthly seminars led by the mathematics and science teacher preparation directors and will have access to high-quality professional development and electronic communications through listservs and blogs.
 

Applicant Eligibility
All qualifying Noyce Scholars must:
  • Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.
  • Earn a baccalaureate, master’s, or doctoral degree in, or are in good academic standing with their institutions of higher education as a junior, senior, or graduate student in a STEM field.
  • Have the sufficient number of credits in the content area of certification as required by New York State teaching certification rules. The requirements have been articulated as follows:
- Mathematics teacher candidates must have a minimum of 30 credits in mathematics coursework, including at least a two-course sequence in calculus.
- Science teacher candidates must have a minimum of 30 credits in science coursework, of which at least 18 should be in biology, chemistry, physics, or geology/earth science (depending on the content area)
- One semester of college level foreign language

Use of Noyce Scholarship
The Noyce Scholarship provides a stipend of $18,000 that is to be used toward tuition charges. Any other tuition benefit available to the students is expected to also be used toward tuition charges. The Warner School will provide a tuition waiver to cover the remaining tuition charges.

Teaching Commitment
UR Warner Noyce scholars will be required to sign a contract with the Warner School stating their commitment to teach math or science in any high-need school district in the United States, although they are encouraged to serve in the Rochester City School District, for a minimum of two years within six years following their graduation from the program. Therefore, only students and professionals who are willing to make this commitment should apply to the Noyce Scholars Program.

By signing the Noyce Service Agreement, students also agree to provide written documentation of their teaching employment to the Warner School registrar. If they fail to meet this teaching service requirement, scholarship recipients must repay the full monetary value of their Noyce award to the University.

What is a high-need district?
For the purposes of the Noyce Scholars Program, the National Science Foundation has defined a highneed school district as one that meets at least one of the following criteria:
  1. It has at least one school in which 50 percent or more of the enrolled students are eligible for participation in the free and reduced price lunch program.
  2. It has at least one school in which: (i) more than 34 percent of the academic classroom teachers at the secondary level (across all academic subjects) do not have an undergraduate degree with a major or minor in, or a graduate degree in, the academic field in which they teach the largest percentage of their classes; or (ii) more than 34 percent of the teachers in two of the academic departments do not have an undergraduate degree with a major or minor in, or a graduate degree in, the academic field in which they teach the largest percentage of their classes.
  3. It has at least one school whose teacher attrition rate has been 15 percent or more over the last three school years.

Program of Study
Noyce scholars will enroll in a 15-month, 39-credit high-quality and innovative graduate program that begins in May of each year and ends in August the following year for full-time students. Graduates of the teacher preparation program will earn a Master of Science (M.S.) in Education and NYS certification to teach their subject of specialization in grades 7-12. Warner’s teacher preparation programs focus on providing future teachers with a solid understanding of research and best practices in science and mathematics education, lesson development, and integrating technology into the teaching of science and mathematics.

Whether students are interested in biology, chemistry, physics, or earth science, our science education programs offer exciting opportunities to explore areas of science and the flexibility to accommodate the interests of individual students. Our programs empower individuals to become teachers who find innovative ways to make science meaningful and relevant to students. Over the last four years, April Luehmann, director of the science teacher preparation program, developed and evolved the Get Real! Science program, a teacher preparation program, to prepare secondary science teachers to implement an inquiry-based approach to science education. This program, which continues to receive national recognition for its innovation, creates opportunities for students to experience inquiry-based science from both the learners’ and teachers’ perspectives by participating in authentic science investigations and teaching reform-based science both in out-of-school and school-based settings, as well as reflective activities including blogging.

Similarly, our mathematics teacher preparation program, which is directed by Jeffrey Choppin, encourages future teachers to make mathematics meaningful and relevant to their students, while promoting classroom environments that support social justice and equity. Our graduate students explore mathematical inquiries and innovative uses of technology and become familiar with NSF-funded reform curricula for successfully teaching mathematics. This program helps students develop an approach to teaching mathematics that is grounded in knowledge of the research, theory, issues and trends influencing mathematics education. Students participate in mathematics education courses and related field experiences that will empower them to teach mathematics with understanding and by capitalizing on high-quality mathematics instructional materials.

In addition to the required pedagogical and specialization coursework, students also will have to complete:
  • A field experience that takes place during the first semester (fall) in a secondary school. Students must complete at least 100 hours of field work.
  • Student teaching placements that take place both during the first semester (fall) and second semester (spring) in a secondary school. Students spend at least four weeks during their first placement in the fall, which generally takes place in the same location as their field experience, and at least eight weeks during their second placement in the spring.

Pedagogical Core Courses:
ED 404 Teaching, Curriculum, and Change
Provides a critical understanding of the context of schooling within which teachers need to operate. Introduces the background philosophy and history required to understand today’s teaching and schools.

EDU 498 Literacy Learning as Social Practice
Develops an understanding of the nature of language practices and literacy learning in classrooms. Examines theories of literacy learning and learning more generally, also addresses current debates in the field of literacy.

ED 447 Disability and Schools
Prepares educators to better understand and respond to the needs of students with disabilities. Examines the concept of disability in society and, more specifically, in education.

ED 400 Topics in Teaching & Schooling
Prepares teachers to address the varied needs of their students and school, beyond typical curricular and academic responsibilities. Topics include conflict resolution, educational law, ethics, listening and counseling skills, career preparation, and school and community relations. This is a two-semester course.

EDU 442 Race, Class, Gender & Disability in American Education
Prepares educators to better understand diversity issues, with the ultimate goal of discontinuing existing practices of exclusion and inequality in schools and society. Surveys and critically analyzes literature on diversity, and encourages candidates to examine their own positions of identity.

ED 415 Adolescent Development & Youth Culture
Develops an understanding of what it means to be an adolescent in present day American culture. Explores adolescent development as an integral part of life-span development, employing cultural, psychological, social, and biological perspectives.

Math Specialization Courses:
EDU 482 Integrating Mathematics and Literacy
Prepares mathematics teachers to capitalize on reading, writing, and other forms of literacy to enhance their students’ learning of mathematics.

EDU 483 Integrating Mathematics and Technology
Prepares secondary mathematics teachers to effectively use technology to enhance mathematics instruction, while furthering their understanding of fundamental ideas and concepts in mathematics. Examines educational technology as a teaching and learning tool in mathematics instruction and how technology may affect instructional goals and teaching practices in mathematics education.

EDU 436 Theory and Practice in Teaching & Learning Mathematics
Prepares teachers to make the learning of mathematics more meaningful and accessible to ALL students in secondary school. Examines the key questions of what mathematics should be taught, why and how, in light of relevant research on the learning and teaching of mathematics, state and national standards, and promising practices.

EDU 444 Implementing Innovation in Mathematics Education
Supports teachers in putting into practice what they learned in EDU 436 to enhance their understanding of key issues in the teaching and learning of mathematics. Introduces and critically examines innovative teaching methods, curricula, and resources to support the teaching of specific mathematical topics, consistent with the National Council of Teacher of Mathematics standards.

Science Specialization Courses:
EDU 487 Integrating Science and Literacy
Prepares science teachers to effectively use reading, writing, and other forms of literacy to enhance science instruction.

EDU 486 Integrating Science and Technology
Prepares secondary science teachers to effectively use technology to enhance science instruction, while furthering their understanding of fundamental ideas and concepts in science. Examines educational technology as a teaching and learning tool in science instruction and the ways in which technology may affect instructional goals and teaching practices in science education.

EDU 434 Theory & Practice in Teaching & Learning Science
Prepares teachers to make the learning of science more meaningful and accessible to ALL students in secondary school. Examines the key questions of what should be taught, why and how, in the secondary school science curriculum, in light of relevant research on the learning and teaching of science, state and national standards, and promising practices.

EDU 448 Implementing Innovation in Science Education
Supports teachers in putting into practice what they learned in EDU 434 to enhance their understanding of key issues in the teaching and learning of science. Introduces and critically examines innovative teaching methods, curricula, and resources to support the teaching of science, consistent with state and national standards.

Sample Sequence of Courses:
Summer I
Fall
Spring
Summer II

Mathematics Specialization
ED 404 Teaching, Curriculum, and Change (3 credits)

EDU 498 Literacy Learning as Social Practice (3 credits)

EDU 482 Integrating Mathematics and Literacy (3 credits)
OR
EDU 483 Integrating Mathematics and Technology (3 credits)

ED 447 Disability and Schools (3 credits)

ED 400 Topics in Teaching & Schooling (3 credits)

EDU 436 Theory  Practice in Teaching  Learning Mathematics (3 credits)

EDF 416/7 Field Experiences in Secondary Schools (2 credits)

ED 415 Adolescent Development & Youth Culture (3 credits)

ED 400 Topics in Teaching & Schooling (2 credits)

EDU 444 Implementing Innovation in Mathematics Education (3 credits)

EDF 418/9 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools (3 credits)

EDF 420/1 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools (4 credits)

EDU 442 Race, Class, Gender & Disability in American Education (3 credits)

ED 415 Adolescent Development & Youth Culture (3 credits)

EDU 482 Integrating Mathematics and Literacy (3 credits)
OR
EDU 483 Integrating Mathematics and Technology (3 credits)

Science Specialization
ED 404 Teaching, Curriculum, and Change (3 credits) 

ED 447 Disability and Schools (3 credits)

ED 400 Topics in Teaching & Schooling (3 credits)

EDU 442 Race, Class, Gender & Disability in Change (3 credits)

EDU 498 Literacy Learning as Social Practice (3 credits)

EDU 487 Integrating Science and Literacy (3 credits)
OR
EDU 486 Integrating Science and Technology (3 credits)

ED 415 Adolescent Development & Youth Culture (3 credits)

ED 400 Topics in Teaching & Schooling (3 credits)

EDU 434 Theory  Practice in Teaching  Learning Science (3 credits)

EDF 416/7 Field Experiences in Secondary Schools (2 credits)

EDU 448 Implementing Innovation in Science Education (3 credits)

EDF 418/9 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools (3 credits)

EDF 420/1 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools (4 credits)

 EDU 487 Integrating Science and Literacy (3 credits)
OR
EDU 486 Integrating Science and Technology (3 credits)

Frequently Asked Questions
What is the Warner School looking for in Noyce scholarship recipients?
We are looking for talented professionals, who are considering a career change to the teaching profession and who have already received a college degree in a STEM field, and STEM students who are expected, or who have graduated with a degree in a STEM field. And we are looking for STEM professionals and students who are committed to teaching in a high-need school district. All candidates must have completed the necessary content preparation prior to entering the master’s program, which as determined by New York State, includes at least 30-credit hours in mathematics or science with a GPA of 2.5 or higher.

Are there service requirements tied to the Noyce scholarship?
Yes. All Noyce scholars must teach middle or high school math or science for at least two years in a highneed school district within six years following their graduation from the program, or otherwise repay the full monetary value of their University tuition if any part of this commitment is not fulfilled. By signing a Noyce Service Agreement, scholarship recipients also agree to provide written documentation of their teaching employment to the Warner School registrar and complete surveys and videotapes required by the project evaluation plan.

Is there a special application deadline for scholarships?
Applicants eligible for the Noyce scholarship must apply by the regular October 15, February 1, April 1, and June 15 admissions deadlines in order to be considered for the scholarship.

What expenses are covered by the Noyce scholarship?
The scholarship covers all tuition costs at the Warner School for the duration of the 39 credits required for the certification. Students are responsible for books and fees, including parking and continuation of enrollment fees, if applicable.

What should I do if I am eligible to receive tuition benefits from my employer?
As a Noyce scholar, you will be required to disclose any other source of tuition benefits and to apply these applicable benefits in full toward your tuition before you are eligible for tuition benefits through the Warner School.

Can I enroll as a part-time student?
The Noyce scholarship applies to both full-time and part-time students; however, preference is given to full-time students. The Warner School also offers other financial aid and scholarships to qualifying candidates for part-time study.

Are there other scholarships available for students who are not eligible for this program or who are not awarded the Noyce scholarship?
Yes. The Warner School offers a number of other attractive scholarship opportunities for students at the non-degree certificate, master’s, and doctoral levels. Please consult with an admissions counselor or review the list of other possible merit scholarships available.

May a Noyce scholarship recipient obtain a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)?
Yes, but the Noyce scholarship only applies to courses taken within the Warner School of Education. The M.A.T. requires an additional 12 credit hours of study in the College of Arts and Sciences, which will not be covered under the Noyce scholarship program.

May a Noyce scholarship recipient take courses in other schools at the University of Rochester?
Yes, but the Noyce scholarship only applies to courses taken within the Warner School of Education.

How will applications be evaluated during the selection criteria?
Applications will be evaluated according to the following criteria:
  • First, an applicant must have a college degree in a STEM field, or will have it by the time s/he will begin our teacher preparation program.
  • Second, an applicant must have the sufficient number of credits in the content area of certification as required by New York State teaching certification rules. STEM majors and professionals who do not meet these requirements will be counseled to take the necessary coursework before applying to the program.

May a Noyce scholarship be used to support doctoral work at the Warner School?
No, not directly. The scholarship may be used only for courses in the master’s program. These programs, however, do provide an excellent foundation for advanced graduate work and may be well-suited for students who have aspirations of continuing their education at the doctoral level. If a Noyce Scholar chooses to pursue doctoral work, s/he must still meet the two-year service requirement of teaching in a high-need school.

For More Information …
For more information or to request an application packet, please contact Admissions at (585) 275-3950 or by e-mail at admissions@warner.rochester.edu.