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Warner Profiles

Tarik Abdulkreem S. Al-Werthan

Tarik Abdulkreem S. Al-Werthan

The Arabic word for octopus, “akhtaboot,” comes to Tarik Abdulkreem S. Al-Werthan’s mind when he talks about the few human development specialists in his native Saudi Arabia, many of which attempt to have many “hands” in places outside their area of expertise.

Ashley Anderson

Ashley Anderson

The traditional way of teaching middle school students about alliteration might include having them write down the definition. But Ashley Anderson is no traditional teacher. She had her students at Rochester’s Urban Choice Charter School do a line dance to understand the repetition of sound.

Chelsea BaileyShea

Chelsea BaileyShea

After studying abroad for one year in France as an undergraduate, Chelsea BaileyShea gained a new perspective on her place in a global society.

Tomás Boatwright

Tomás Boatwright

When he wanted to know more about a topic that was brought up in school but not, in his opinion, sufficiently covered, Tomás Boatwright headed to the library or scoured the Internet for more information.

Paulina Aravena Bravo

Paulina Aravena Bravo

MS, Human Development
Chile

Before coming to Warner, Aravena Bravo worked as a speech therapist, both one-on-one with students, many with developmental disabilities, and as a consultant of sorts to a group of special education teachers.

Karin Brendel

Karin Brendel

As the first to earn an MS in health professions education degree in 2009—she had to finish early to take a job offer in Switzerland—Karin Brendel had experience being at the forefront of a new academic program, developed by the Warner School of Education, the School of Nursing, and the School of Medicine and Dentistry. Now she has designed and is implementing a midwife education program at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences.

Mary Ellen Burris

Mary Ellen Burris

Trust from customers takes many forms, and is a critical success factor in any enduring corporation. Mary Ellen Burris, an entrepreneur at heart, has been instrumental in setting the tone for success at Wegmans Food Markets.

Mathis Calvin III

Mathis Calvin III

Mathis Calvin III has a long history of helping others, starting in high school, when he would swap study hall for the chance to assist in a classroom of students with multiple disabilities. That led to his first job at a summer camp working with children who had special needs—a job ultimately responsible for his interest in becoming a special education teacher.

Renae Carapella-Johnson

Renae Carapella-Johnson

Renae Carapella entered college as a journalism major but switched to psychology her sophomore year, after her younger brother was hospitalized for the first time for depression. She figured it would help her better understand what he was going through, so that she could help him deal with his mental illness.

Kai Chitaphong

Kai Chitaphong

Kai Chitaphong was four when his father woke him up in the middle of the night and told him to grab his things, that the family was leaving Laos.

Kathryn Coliccio

Kathryn Coliccio

In 2006, 12 years after enrolling at Warner, Kathryn Colicchio got called to the main office at East High School, where she was working at the time as an administrator. There waiting for her was Brian Brent, Warner’s associate dean for graduate studies. The unannounced visit was an attempt to persuade Colicchio, who had finished her coursework nearly a decade earlier, to finish her dissertation.

Patty Cooke

Patty Cooke

Patty Cooke’s research interests in philosophy and education are more timely than ever given the current spotlight on critical thinking, deemed essential to the academic and personal development of young minds.  As Common Core State Standards continue to dictate changes in instruction, the school counselor and lead teacher hopes her work will encourage schools to do more to help students be open-minded, reflective and adaptive.

Rita D'Aoust

Rita D'Aoust

Rita D’Aoust says she was “a strange bird” when she arrived at Warner as a nurse who wanted a research doctorate in teaching and curriculum—and who wanted to remain relevant in health professions education and nursing research.

John DiSarro

John DiSarro

As an undergraduate, John DiSarro spent two years as a resident assistant and fraternity member, making connections with other students that would shape his plans for the future.

Sarah Entenmann

Sarah Entenmann

As an undergraduate volunteering with the Hamilton College Emergency Medical Service, Sarah Entenmann assisted a freshman having asthma problems and an allergic reaction. Soon after, the freshman walked up to her at a campus event, thanked her for her help, turned around and walked away into the crowd.

Beatriz M. Folch-Torres

Beatriz M. Folch-Torres

Trained as a dancer since the age of six, Beatriz M. Folch-Torres led classical ballet classes in high school and then as an undergraduate at the University of Puerto Rico, her native country, to help pay for pointe shoes. She was going through a couple pairs a week, and they were expensive.

Eric E. Fredericksen

Eric E. Fredericksen

Eric E. Fredericksen has a national reputation for blending teaching and technology—a reputation that has yielded awards, journal articles, book chapters, and a sustained commitment on his part to moving the field of online education forward.

Jeremy Friedman

Jeremy Friedman

Jeremy Friedman spends most workdays researching proposals, writing reports, and looking at data files in the Washington, D.C. office of WestEd, a national non-partisan, nonprofit agency that works to improve education.

Dawn Glasgow-Cummings

Dawn Glasgow-Cummings

Before moving to Rochester about a decade ago, Dawn Glasgow-Cummings was in charge of a government, state-owned early childhood education program in Linden, a largely populated and well-developed bauxite mining town in the small country of Guyana, South America.

Jody Goodman

Jody Goodman

For Jody Goodman, who graduated in 2012 with an accelerated EdD in higher education, Warner administrators and staff reinforced what her grandfather had always told her—that education is a right, not a privilege.

Sham Haidar

Sham Haidar

PhD, Teaching, Curriculum, and Change
Pakistan

In his native Pakistan, Sham Haidar would often get into trouble in school for speaking his mind. He was warned not to discuss his opinions so openly, and expected to always know the one correct answer to every question his teachers asked.

Alice Harnischfeger

Alice Harnischfeger

As a former teacher in a suburban school considered high-performing by state standards, Alice Harnischfeger was haunted by the students who were struggling academically in school despite not fitting into any special needs categories. The number was small, about 1 to 3 percent, but when she thought about what that meant when multiplied across every school in every district, the implication was significant.

Joseph Henderson

Joseph Henderson

Joseph A. Henderson grew up in a working-class family in a one-road town located in the middle of an oil drilling field. With no television (not until he was 16), he spent his days playing outside and building an informal, earnest relationship with the natural world around him. At the time, though, he didn’t realize the damaging effect these oil pits had on the environment, wildlife, and human health—not until he took a geology class as an undergrad.

Suzanne Hess

Suzanne Hess

Suzanne Hess grew up doing what she thought she was supposed to do.

“There was an expectation that my job was to excel in school and that it was going to be a very linear path from high school to college to graduate school to a career,” says the master’s student in the educational leadership program at Warner. “I just didn’t really think there was a lot of room for asking questions.”

Kimberly Jackson

Kimberly Jackson

Kimberly Jackson could have commuted 10 minutes to a nearby university while earning her doctorate in higher education. Instead the Buffalo resident drove twice, sometimes three times, a week—often through inclement weather—to Warner because of an interaction she’d had with Assistant Professor Logan Hazen after an information session.

Jayne Lammers

Jayne Lammers

Except for a short adolescent stint playing Dr. Mario and Pac-Man, Jayne Lammers had no interest in video games—and certainly rejected the notion that they had any educational value.

Kathryn Lantuh

Kathryn Lantuh

In a newly created position as physical education and physical activity specialist for the state-level education agency in Washington, D.C., Kathryn Lantuh is responsible for promoting the health and wellness of some 80,000 students in more than 200 public and public charter schools.

Orlando Marrero

Orlando Marrero

It can be difficult for teachers to help students grasp a theoretical scientific concept like energy. But have them make windmills—and stage a competition to see which one generates the most energy over time—and they easily make a connection between the idea of energy and the use of energy to make electricity.

Sandra Quiñones

Sandra Quiñones

With her father working as a civilian engineer for the Navy in their native Puerto Rico, Sandra Quiñones grew up attending an on-base U.S. Department of Defense school. She had few Latino teachers, started learning English in kindergarten and took her first Spanish class in middle school. She took a 30-minute bus ride to get there while her neighborhood friends attended local schools.

Yanti Sri Rezeki

Yanti Sri Rezeki

Though English wasn’t taught at the elementary school level in her native Indonesia, Yanti Sri Rezeki would learn what she could while watching westerns and other English-subtitled movies on television. She received two hours of formal English training per week in junior high, and by high school, wanting even more instruction but unable to afford private lessons, decided to develop her skills independently, and was soon representing her school in English speech contests.

Laura Rog

Laura Rog

Hard work and tenacity are central to Laura Rog’s being. And they have been ever since the Warner master’s graduate (’09) was a child.

Dawn Santiago-Marullo

Dawn Santiago-Marullo

Dawn Santiago-Marullo had read Stephen Covey and other authors known for their effective management tips, but a book she studied while at Warner—titled Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice, and Leadership—has been the most pivotal influence in her job as superintendent of the Victor Central School District.

Burke Scarbrough

Burke Scarbrough

After graduating from Teachers College at Columbia University, Burke Scarbrough figured he’d get his feet wet, like any new grad, with a teaching job. His full-time teaching gig became more than just that. Scarbrough was given an opportunity of a lifetime to start a new school in New York City.

Susan Schroeder Seacrest

Susan Schroeder Seacrest

Susan Schroeder Seacrest, a Nebraska homemaker who turned her concern over the quality of local groundwater into a national campaign to educate policymakers, farmers, businesses, and students about drinking water pollution, was a co-recipient of the 13th annual $250,000 Heinz Award for the Environment, among the largest individual achievement prizes in the world.

Tricia Stewart

Tricia Stewart

Tricia Stewart’s journey to being in education was nontraditional, but what has swept her there is her passion for making a difference.

James Sunser

James Sunser

With parents who never had the chance to go to college, James Sunser ’10 (EdD) grew up to appreciate education as a fundamental piece of the American dream.

Shannon Walton

Shannon Walton

Athletes have coaches that help them run faster, kick the ball farther, swim with more speed and grace. Shannon Walton ‘08, who grew up playing soccer, believes that the best performances combine those technical tactics with an emotional confidence equally worthy of training.

Nicoisa Young

Nicoisa Young

Nicoisa (Nikki) Young’s fervent desire to impact the lives of children and help them excel in life has guided her back to her hometown of Washington, D.C. As one of the first students to enroll in the Warner School’s new educational policy master’s program, Young found herself a year later returning to the same high school that she attended years ago—this time as a policy analyst.

Yingjia Zheng

Yingjia Zheng

In her hometown of Shenzhen, China, Yingjia Zheng taught Chinese to foreigners the way she’d been taught in school. “We throw balls to students there,” she says, her way of explaining that delivery of instruction comes strictly from the teacher.