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University of Rochester Warner School of Education
Science Teaching Reflection Science (2012 standards)
 
Assessment Plan
When Rubrics assigned Course Evaluator
1st registration to all students EDU434: Theory and Practice in Teaching and Learning Science instructor
Programs Assessed: NB1 NB2 NK1 NK2 NP1 NP2 NZ1 NZ2 PB1 PB2 PB5 PB6 PB8 PK1 PK2 PK5 PK6 PK8 PP1 PP2 
PP5 PP6 PP8 PZ1 PZ2 PZ5 PZ6 PZ8 SB1 SB2 SB3 SK1 SK2 SK3 SP1 SP2 SP3 SZ1 SZ2 SZ3 
TB1 TB2 TB3 TB4 TK1 TK2 TK3 TK4 TP1 TP2 TP3 TP4 TZ1 TZ2 TZ3 TZ4 
 
Rubric
 
Candidate: Evaluator:
Semester and Year (required): Course #:
Date:
Description:
 
Please evaluate the extent to which the candidate has met each of the standards listed below, using the following rubrics:
1. Insufficient: The criteria described are not met. In order to obtain a passing grade in this assignment, the candidate must redo all or part of the unit as directed by the course professor.
2. Emergent/needs improvement: The criteria described are partially met. Minor revisions in the paper are called for to address the shortcomings identified and should be completed before the candidate can “pass” this assignment.
3. Basic proficiency: The criteria described are essentially met. The instructional plans can be used as evidence that the candidate is able to plan, implement and evaluate worthwhile instructional units.
4. Outstanding performance: The plans of the investigation fully meet the criteria described and provides an outstanding example that the candidate is able to plan, implement and evaluate worthwhile and innovative instructional units.
 
Part I - NSTA Standards for Science teacher candidates

NSTA 2012 1: Content Knowledge 
NSTA 2012 1 Content Knowledge Effective teachers of science understand and articulate the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. They interrelate and interpret important concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of licensure.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations documentation demonstrate insufficient understanding of the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. Evidence of interrelationship and interpretation of important concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of licensure is missing.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate basic understanding of the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. E Some evidence of interrelationship and interpretation of important concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of licensure is included.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate clear understanding of the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. Evidence of interrelationship and interpretation of important concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of licensure is included.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate advanced understanding of the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. Evidence of interrelationship and interpretation of important concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of licensure is included.
NSTA 2012 1a Field of Licensure Pre-service teachers will understand most of the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and interrelationships of their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science Teachers Association
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate insufficient knowledge and understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and interrelationships of their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science Teachers Association.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate basic understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and interrelationships of their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science Teachers Association.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate proficient understanding of most of the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and interrelationships of their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science Teachers Association.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate detailed understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and interrelationships of their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science Teachers Association.
NSTA 2012 1c Impact of Standards on Students Pre-service teachers will show an understanding of state and national curriculum standards and their impact on the content knowledge necessary for teaching P-12 students.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate insufficient understanding of state and national curriculum standards and their impact on the content knowledge necessary for teaching P-12 students.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate a basic understanding of state and national curriculum standards and their impact on the content knowledge necessary for teaching P-12 students.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate a proficient understanding of state and national curriculum standards and their impact on the content knowledge necessary for teaching P-12 students.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate a detailed understanding of state and national curriculum standards and their impact on the content knowledge necessary for teaching P-12 students.

NSTA 2012 2: Content Pedagogy 
NSTA 2012 2 Content Pedagogy Effective teachers of science understand how students learn and develop scientific knowledge. Preservice teachers use scientific inquiry to develop this knowledge for all students.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate insufficient understanding of how students learn and develop scientific knowledge and use scientific inquiry inconsistently to develop this knowledge for all students.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate basic understanding of how students learn and develop scientific knowledge and take some advantage of using scientific inquiry to develop this knowledge for all students.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate how students learn and develop scientific knowledge. Candidates use scientific inquiry to develop this knowledge for all students.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate a detailed understanding of how students learn and develop scientific knowledge and optimize use of scientific inquiry to develop this knowledge for all students.
NSTA 2012 2a Evidence of Inquiry Approach Pre-service teachers will plan multiple lessons using a variety of inquiry approaches that demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of how all students learn science.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include inquiry approaches that demonstrate insufficient knowledge and understanding of how students learn science.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include a variety of inquiry approaches and demonstrate a basic knowledge and understanding of how students learn science.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include a variety of inquiry approaches and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how all students learn science.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include a variety of inquiry approaches and demonstrate mastery level knowledge and understanding of how all students learn science.
NSTA 2012 2b Nature of Science Pre-service teachers will include active inquiry lessons where students collect and interpret data in order to develop and communicate concepts and understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. Applications of science-specific technology are included in the lessons when appropriate.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations do not provide opportunities for students to collect and interpret data or data use does not support students to develop and communicate concepts and understand scientific processes, relationships, and natural patterns. Applications of science-specific technology are not included in the lessons.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations includes some active inquiry opportunities where students collect and interpret data in order to develop and communicate concepts and understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. Applications of science-specific technology are included in the lessons when appropriate.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include frequent active inquiry opportunities where students collect and interpret data in order to develop and communicate concepts and understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. Applications of science-specific technology are included in the lessons when appropriate.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observation consistently include inquiry opportunities where students collect and interpret data in order to develop and communicate concepts and understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. Applications of science-specific technology are included in the lessons when appropriate.

NSTA 2012 3: Learning Environments 
NSTA 2012 3 Learning Environments Effective teachers of science are able to plan for engaging all students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. The plans reflect the nature and social context of science, inquiry, and appropriate safety considerations. Candidates design and select learning activities, instructional settings, and resources--including science-specific technology, to achieve those goals; and they plan fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations lack clarity for engaging all students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. The plans inconsistently reflect the nature and social context of science, inquiry, and appropriate safety considerations. The plans reflect inconsistent design and selection of learning activities, instructional settings, and resources--including science-specific technology, to achieve those goals; and inconsistently demonstrate fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations minimally provide for engaging all students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. The plans minimally reflect the nature and social context of science, inquiry, and appropriate safety considerations. The plans reflect minimally designed and selected learning activities, instructional settings, and resources--including science-specific technology, to achieve those goals; and minimally demonstrate fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations consistently provide for engaging all students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. The plans consistently reflect the nature and social context of science, inquiry, and appropriate safety considerations. The plans reflect design and selection of learning activities, instructional settings, and resources--including science-specific technology, to achieve those goals; and they demonstrate fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations optimally provide for engaging all students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. All plans reflect the nature and social context of science, inquiry, and appropriate safety considerations. All lesson plans reflect design and selection of learning activities, instructional settings, and resources--including science-specific technology, to achieve those goals; and they demonstrate fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met.
NSTA 2012 3a Use of strategies to support learning for all students Pre-service teachers will use a variety of strategies that demonstrate the candidates’ knowledge and understanding of how to select the appropriate teaching and learning activities – including laboratory or field settings and applicable instruments and/or technology- to allow access so that all students learn. These strategies are inclusive and motivating for all students.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include insufficient use of strategies to demonstrate the candidates’ knowledge and understanding of how to select the appropriate teaching and learning activities – including laboratory or field settings and applicable instruments and/or technology- to allow access so that most students learn. These strategies are inconsistently inclusive and motivating for students.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include basic use of strategies to demonstrate the candidates’ knowledge and understanding of how to select the appropriate teaching and learning activities – including laboratory or field settings and applicable instruments and/or technology- to allow access so that most students learn. These strategies are inclusive and motivating for most students.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include a variety of strategies to demonstrate the candidates’ knowledge and understanding of how to select the appropriate teaching and learning activities – including laboratory or field settings and applicable instruments and/or technology- to allow access so that all students learn. These strategies are inclusive and motivating for all students.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations include a variety of strategies to demonstrate the candidates’ knowledge and understanding of how to select the appropriate teaching and learning activities – including laboratory or field settings and applicable instruments and/or technology- to allow access so that all students learn. These strategies are inclusive and motivating for all students.
NSTA 2012 3b Lesson planning that supports scientific literacy Pre-service teachers will develop lesson plans that include active inquiry lessons where students collect and interpret data using applicable science-specific technology in order to develop concepts, understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. These plans provide for equitable achievement of science literacy for all students.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans include minimal inquiry opportunities where students collect and interpret data using applicable science-specific technology in order to develop concepts, understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. These plans provide for equitable achievement of science literacy for some students.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans include basic inquiry opportunities where students collect and interpret data using applicable science-specific technology in order to develop concepts, understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. These plans provide for equitable achievement of science literacy for most students.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans include active inquiry opportunities where students collect and interpret data using applicable science-specific technology in order to develop concepts, understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. These plans provide for equitable achievement of science literacy for all students.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans include advanced inquiry opportunities where students collect and interpret data using applicable science-specific technology in order to develop concepts, understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. These plans provide for equitable achievement of science literacy for all students.
NSTA 2012 3d Lesson planning to support classroom safety Pre-service teachers will plan a learning environment and learning experiences for all students that demonstrate chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms within their licensure area.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans do not articulate a learning environment and learning experiences for all students that demonstrate chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms within their licensure area.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans sometimes articulate a learning environment and learning experiences for all students that demonstrate chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms within their licensure area.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans articulate a learning environment and learning experiences for all students that demonstrate chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms within their licensure area.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans consistently articulate a learning environment and learning experiences for all students that demonstrate chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms within their

NSTA 2012 5: Impact on Student Learning 
NSTA 2012 5 Impact on Student Learning Effective teachers of science provide evidence to show that P-12 students’ understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization. Candidates provide evidence for the diversity of students they teach.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection provide evidence to show that P-12 students’ understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization. Candidates provide insufficient evidence for the diversity of students they teach.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection provide evidence to show that P-12 students’ understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization. Candidates provide insufficient evidence for the diversity of students they teach.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection provide evidence to show that P-12 students’ understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization. Candidates provide clear evidence for the diversity of students they teach.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection provide evidence to show that P-12 students’ understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization. Candidates provide exemplary evidence for the diversity of students they teach.
NSTA 2012 5a Analysis of assessment data Pre-service teachers will collect, organize, analyze, and reflect on diagnostic, formative and summative evidence of a change in mental functioning demonstrating that scientific knowledge is gained and/or corrected.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection demonstrate inconsistent proficiency in collecting, organizing, analyzing, and reflecting on diagnostic, formative and summative evidence of a change in mental functioning demonstrating that scientific knowledge is gained and/or corrected.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection demonstrate basic proficiency in collecting, organizing, analyzing, and reflecting on diagnostic, formative and summative evidence of a change in mental functioning demonstrating that scientific knowledge is gained and/or corrected.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection demonstrate solid proficiency in collecting, organizing, analyzing, and reflecting on diagnostic, formative and summative evidence of a change in mental functioning demonstrating that scientific knowledge is gained and/or corrected.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection demonstrate advanced proficiency in collecting, organizing, analyzing, and reflecting on diagnostic, formative and summative evidence of a change in mental functioning demonstrating that scientific knowledge is gained and/or corrected.
NSTA 2012 5b Evidence of student learning in scientific practices Pre-service teachers will provide data to show that P-12 students are able to distinguish science from nonscience understand the evolution and practice of science as a human endeavor, and critically analyze assertions made in the name of science.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection demonstrate that P-12 students are not able to distinguish science from nonscience understand the evolution and practice of science as a human endeavor, and critically analyze assertions made in the name of science.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection supports that P-12 students are able to distinguish science from nonscience, understand the evolution and practice of science as a human endeavor, and critically analyze assertions made in the name of science at a basic level.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection clearly demonstrates that P-12 students are able to distinguish science from nonscience understand the evolution and practice of science as a human endeavor, and critically analyze assertions made in the name of science at a proficient level.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Classroom observations and post-observation teacher reflection clearly demonstrates that P-12 students are able to distinguish science from nonscience understand the evolution and practice of science as a human endeavor, and critically analyze assertions made in the name of science at a distinguished level.
NSTA 2012 5c Engagement of students in scientific practices Pre-service teachers will engage students in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a scientific manner.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate insufficient evidence of engaging students in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a scientific manner.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate basic evidence of engaging students in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a scientific manner.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate proficient evidence engaging students in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a scientific manner.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Lesson plans and/or classroom observations demonstrate detailed evidence of engaging students in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a scientific manner.
 
Part II - Warner School Science Standards

Nature of Science 
Science4 Understand nature of science Candidates have a solid understanding of the nature of science and can distinguish science from other content areas.
Science5 Involve students in nature of science Candidates involve their students in the nature of science, including the process of analyzing doubtful claims made in the name of science.

Issues in Science 
Science6 Societal issues Candidates can identify important societal issues related to science and technology and understand scientific processes used to make decisions about such issues.

Science in the Community 
Science8 Scientific community Candidates use community resources and stakeholders to connect their students to the scientific community.
Science9 Involve students in community issues Candidates engage their students in scientific learning that helps address important issues in their community.
 
Part III - Warner School Standards

Warner School 1 CONTENT PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches, as identified by relevant professional organizations, and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for all students.
WS 1.2 Subject matter understanding Candidates have a good understanding of some of the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structures of the subject matter(s) taught, and have developed strategies and skills to continue their learning in this area.
WS 1.3 Curriculum standards Candidates are familiar with the principles and concepts delineated in professional, New York State, and Warner School Teaching and Curriculum standards, and their implications for curricular and instructional decisions.
WS 1.4 Meaningful learning experiences Candidates are able to create learning experiences that make the subject matter meaningful and relevant for all students.

Warner School 2 LEARNING PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands how all children learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social and personal development. The teacher candidate understands that learning involves active engagement in culturally valued activities with knowledgeable others and the construction of new knowledge.
WS 2.2 Knowledge construction & culture Candidates understand that all students construct knowledge through active engagement in culturally valued activities, and know what is appropriate for their students to learn, based on their age/grade level and the strengths, experiences and resources of their family/community background
WS 2.3 Building on students' experiences Candidates are able to provide learning experiences that take into consideration the students' developmental level and draw on the strengths and resources available in students' prior experiences, as well as the school, family, and community contexts in which they live.

Warner School 3 EQUITY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. The teacher understands the role each of us plays in the maintenance and transformation of social and educational practices that engender inequity and is committed to promote equity and social justice.
WS 3.1 Equity principles Candidates understand equity and social justice principles, including everyone's right to have an opportunity to learn and what constitutes equitable and socially just behavior and treatment for themselves and others.
WS 3.2 Respect of diversity Candidates are committed to high moral and ethical standards and respect and value their students' differences in contexts and approaches to learning.
WS 3.3 Understanding differences & disabilities Candidates are familiar with some of the cultural, linguistic and learning differences and/or disabilities their students may present and their implications for the classroom.
WS 3.4 Culturally relevant learning experiences Candidates are able to provide learning experiences that are culturally relevant and address the strengths and needs of all students.

Warner School 4 PEDAGOGY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands the link between content and pedagogy. As such, the teacher candidate understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage all students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills that are appropriate for specific topics and subject areas, as identified by the relevant professional organization(s). The teacher candidate is able to use and problematize the various technologies available to facilitate learning.
WS 4.1 Knowing a variety of instructional strategies Candidates are familiar with a wide array of instructional strategies consistent with professional, New York State and Warner School program standards, and understand their potential uses, values and limitations for achieving specific learning goals.
WS 4.2 Using innovative strategies Candidates are able to use a variety of teaching and learning strategies and classroom structures to achieve the learning goals articulated in relevant professional, New York State and Warner School program standards.
WS 4.3 Understand value and limitations of technology Candidates understand the potential values as well as problems and limitations of using technology in instruction.

Warner School 5 LEARNING COMMUNITY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation for all students.
WS 5.1 Understand student motivation Candidates understand what may encourage or hinder student motivation and engagement in learning, based on an analysis of research and practice.
WS 5.2 Create safe classroom environment Candidates are able to construct comfortable and safe classroom environments for all students.
WS 5.3 Foster community of learners Candidates are able to construct a classroom environment that supports student motivation and learning and the creation of a "community of learners."

Warner School 6 COMMUNICATION PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands the key role played by language in teaching and learning. The teacher candidate uses knowledge of effective verbal, non-verbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
WS 6.1 Understand role of language Candidates understand the role of language in teaching and learning.
WS 6.2 Proficient in various modes of communication Candidates are familiar with and proficient in a wide variety of modes and vehicles for communication that can support learning and inquiry for all students.
WS 6.3 Uses communication to support learning Candidates are able to use effectively a variety of modes of communication to make ideas accessible to all students and foster inquiry.

Warner School 7 PLANNING PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.
WS 7.1 Standards-based planning Candidates are able to align instruction with learning goals consistent with professional and New York State standards.
WS 7.2 Unit planning and implementation Candidates are able to implement lessons according to a well- defined and high quality plan.

Warner School 8 ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continual intellectual, social and physical development of all learners and to inform instruction. Assessment is embedded in authentic learning activities that are for real audiences and real purposes.
WS 8.2 Use appropriate assessments Candidates are able to use a variety of assessment and evaluation strategies, including some that are embedded in authentic learning activities and have real audiences and purposes, to monitor, assess and provide guidance to student learning.
WS 8.3 Using assessment inform instruction Candidates are able to use assessment to inform instruction by making links between their teaching and student performance and by adjusting their practice as a result of analysis of and reflection on student assessment data.

Warner School 9 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally, including staying up to date with research, theories and best practices in his/her field.
WS 9.1 Committed to improvement Candidates are committed to continue to learn and improve their practice throughout their teaching career.
WS 9.2 Reflection on practice Candidates are able to reflect on their practices, constructively use critiques of their practice, and draw from theories and research results, in order to make necessary adjustments to enhance student learning.

Warner School 10 COMMUNITY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents/ caregivers, and agencies in the larger community to support students' learning and well-being.
WS10.1 Valuing community involvement Candidates value and seek out parental and community involvement.
 
Notes: