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University of Rochester Warner School of Education
Innovative Unit Project Social Studies
 
Candidate: Evaluator:
Semester and Year (required): Course #:
Date:
Description:
 
Guidelines for teacher candidates
All teacher candidates are required to design and implement innovative units in their student teaching and/or practicum experiences. As in the case of lesson plans, we believe it is important in at least one case to make explicit your thinking processes about design, implementation, and assessment. The following guidelines explain the minimum required components we expect in innovative unit papers. This assessment, in conjunction with final student teaching evaluations, will determine if a candidate will “pass” student teaching. Assessment of the innovative unit paper will occur on two levels: 1) Candidate ability to design, implement, and analyze the unit as described in these guidelines, and 2) Candidate ability to address in the unit the relevant standards set by their professional organization and Warner School proficiencies. The rubric is divided into three parts and is included in this packet. Content area faculty may provide additional rubrics specific to that specialization.

Required Unit Components:
  1. Introduction: This section should provide a brief description of the unit that gives a context for the components of the unit, including an essential question and/or topic addressed if appropriate. Include a clear description of the context of implementation for the unit, including grade level, racial, ethnic and gender make-up of students and teachers, a description of the school and classroom, and whether the implementation occurred in the first or second student teaching/practicum experience.
  2. Theoretical framework: Provide a clear, well thought out theoretical framework that both guides and provides a foundation for, the unit, using course readings (and outside readings where appropriate). Candidates should state their definition of the content area addressed and their theory of learning. In other words, how does your definition of [literacy, language, science, math, English, social studies] and theory of learning frame the unit? This section should also include a clear rationale for the unit (e.g. why is this unit important? Why will student learning be meaningful and relevant in this unit?).
  3. Goals/Professional Standards: Describe the overarching goal/s of the unit and connect the goal/s to the larger curriculum in your class (e.g. an integrated curriculum in elementary or the specific content area in secondary). Discuss the professional and/or state standards this unit addresses. Make explicit the specific content addressed and connections to the theoretical framework, curriculum, and overarching unit goal/s.
  4. Objectives: Clearly articulate the specific unit objectives and connect these objectives to the unit goals and professional standards.
  5. Assessment of Student Learning over Time: Describe the multiple forms of assessment used across the unit. Include formative, summative, formal, and informal assessments. Explicitly connect your assessment to the theoretical framework, unit goals and objectives, and professional standards. In other words, how will your assessments help you scaffold student learning over time and how will you know you have accomplished your goals? How will your assessments inform instruction?
  6. Pedagogy: Describe the series of connected lessons and/or experiences in the unit. Include your detailed lesson plans for selected lessons in this section using the lesson plan format given to you. Describe in detail how you will scaffold and support student learning over time, and address any relevant safety considerations.
  7. Unit Implementation: Describe what happened when you implemented this unit, with particular attention to students’ responses to its main activities. Reflect on what went well and what you would change in future implementations.
  8. Analysis of student learning: Report the results of a systematic analysis of what your students learned as a result of the unit, making explicit references to goals and objectives, and using data from formal assessments and classroom observations (see number 5 above). Refer as appropriate to the assessment results and student work in an appendix to support your claims.
  9. Unit Analysis: This section is a detailed analysis of the implementation of the unit that brings together content, theory, and practice. Describe how you have integrated the components of the unit into a coherent whole that produces meaningful and relevant student learning and addresses the goals articulated in Part 2 and 3 of the rubric. Connect the unit implementation with the larger curriculum and theoretical framework described in the introduction.
  10. Appendix: Include: 1) text of key assignments and assessments, including rubrics or handouts given to students; 2) aggregate assessment data; 3) samples of student work with your comments.
There are three parts to this evaluation:
Part I: Designed to evaluate the extent to which the candidate has fulfilled the requirements of this project, as outlined in the detailed description of the assignment. Failing to do so may require the candidate to revise or redo the assignment before he/she can pass the course.
Part II: Designed to evaluate the extent to which the candidate has met some key standards about planning and implementing instruction set by his/her professional organization.
Part III: Designed to evaluate the extent to which the candidate has met some key proficiencies identified as target for all Warner teacher candidates.
 
Please remember to complete all three parts. Each part has different rubrics, so please carefully review the instructions provided at the beginning of each part before scoring.
 
We expect both the candidate and the instructor to independently complete this evaluation. 
 
Part I - Innovative Unit Rubrics

Please evaluate the extent to which the candidate has completed each component of the unit report as intended, using the following rubrics:
1. Insufficient: The criteria described are not met. In order to obtain a passing grade in this assignment, the candidate must redo all or part of the unit as directed by the course professor.
2. Emergent/needs improvement: The criteria described are partially met. Minor revisions in the paper are called for to address the shortcomings identified and should be completed before the candidate can “pass” this assignment.
3. Basic proficiency: The criteria described are essentially met. The Innovative Unit report can be used as evidence that the candidate is able to plan, implement and evaluate worthwhile instructional units.
4. Outstanding performance: The unit fully meets the criteria described and provides an outstanding example that the candidate is able to plan, implement and evaluate worthwhile and innovative instructional units.

Unit Components 
UNIT 1 Introduction  This section should provide a brief description of the unit that gives a context for the components of the unit, including an essential question and/or topic addressed if appropriate. Include a clear description of the context of implementation for the unit, including grade level, racial, ethnic and gender make-up of students and teachers, a description of the school and classroom, and whether the implementation occurred in the first or second student teaching/practicum experience.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
The description of the unit does not provide a context for the components of the unit and does not include an essential question and/or topic addressed. The description of the context of implementation is inadequate.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
The description of the unit gives some context for the components of the unit and includes an essential question and/or topic addressed where appropriate. The description of the context of implementation is partial or incomplete.
(3) Basic Proficiency
The description of the unit gives a sufficient context for the components of the unit and includes an essential question and/or topic addressed where appropriate. The description of the context of implementation is clear, but some specifics are not present.
(4) Outstanding Performance
The description of the unit gives a clear context for the components of the unit and includes an essential question and/or topic addressed where appropriate. The description of the context of implementation is clear and rich and includes grade level, racial, ethnic, and gender make-up of students and teachers, a description of the school and classroom, and indicated to which student teaching experience the unit applies.
UNIT 2 Theoretical Framework Provide a clear, well thought out theoretical framework that both guides and provides a foundation for, the unit, using course readings (and outside readings where appropriate). Candidates should state their definition of the content area addressed and their theory of learning. In other words, how does your definition of [literacy, language, science, math, English, social studies] and theory of learning frame the unit? This section should also include a clear rationale for the unit (e.g. why is this unit important? Why will student learning be meaningful and relevant in this unit?).
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
The theoretical framework is not articulated. Candidate has not adequately used course readings. The definition of the content area addressed and the theory of learning are unclear. The rationale for the unit is not clearly stated with little or no articulation of the importance of the unit to meaningful and relevant student learning.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
The theoretical framework is somewhat articulated. Candidate has used some course readings where appropriate. The definition of the content area addressed and the theory of learning are unclear. The rationale for the unit provides some articulation of the importance of the unit to meaningful and relevant student learning.
(3) Basic Proficiency
The theoretical framework sufficiently guides, and provides a foundation for, the unit. Candidate has used course readings where appropriate. There is both a definition of the content area addressed and a theory of learning with some connections to the larger curriculum. The rationale for the unit sufficiently explains the importance of the unit to meaningful and relevant student learning.
(4) Outstanding Performance
The theoretical framework is clear and well thought out. It clearly guides, and provides a foundation for, the unit. Candidate has used course readings and has included some outside readings where appropriate. There is both a definition of the content area addressed and a theory of learning. The rationale for the unit clearly explains the importance of the unit to meaningful and relevant student learning.
UNIT 3 Goals/Professional Standards Describe the overarching goal/s of the unit and connect the goal/s to the larger curriculum in your class (e.g. an integrated curriculum in elementary or the specific content area in secondary). Discuss the professional and/or state standards this unit addresses. Make explicit the specific content addressed and connections to the theoretical framework, curriculum, and overarching unit goal/s.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
The overarching goal/s and/or larger curriculum are not adequately described and no connections are made. The specific goals for the unit are not adequately described. Few, if any, links to a discussion of the professional standards this unit addresses are provided. There are no connections to the content addressed, the theoretical framework, curriculum, theoretical framework and overarching unit goal/s.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
The overarching goal/s and the larger curriculum are described but the connections are unclear. The specific goals for the unit are vaguely described. Some links to a discussion of the professional standards this unit addresses are provided. There are a few connections to the content addressed, the theoretical framework, curriculum, theoretical framework and overarching unit goal/s.
(3) Basic Proficiency
The overarching goal/s and connections to the larger curriculum are sufficiently described. The specific goals for the unit are sufficiently stated and are linked to a discussion of the professional standards this unit addresses. There are some connections to the content addressed, the theoretical framework, curriculum, theoretical framework and overarching unit goal/s.
(4) Outstanding Performance
The overarching goal/s and connections to the larger curriculum are clearly articulated. The specific goals for the unit are clearly stated and are explicitly linked to a thorough discussion of the professional standards this unit addresses. Explicit connections to the content addressed, the theoretical framework, curriculum, and overarching unit goal/s are richly described.
UNIT 4 Objectives Clearly articulate the specific unit objectives and connect these objectives to the unit goals and professional standards.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Specific unit objectives are not clearly stated and connections between these objectives and the unit goals and professional standards are not described.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Some specific unit objectives are stated and connections between these objectives and the unit goals and professional standards are briefly described.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Specific unit objectives are articulated and connections between these objectives and the unit goals and professional standards are sufficiently discussed.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Specific unit objectives are clearly articulated and connections between these objectives and the unit goals and professional standards are thoroughly discussed.
UNIT 5 Assessment Assessment of Student Learning over Time: Describe the multiple forms of assessment used across the unit. Include formative, summative, formal, and informal assessments. Explicitly connect your assessment to the theoretical framework, unit goals and objectives, and professional standards. In other words, how will your assessments help you scaffold student learning over time and how will you know you have accomplished your goals? How will your assessments inform instruction?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
The multiple forms of assessment used across the unit are not described and do not include an appropriate range of assessments. Assessments are not connected to the theoretical framework, unit goals and objectives, and professional standards. How assessments will facilitate the scaffolding of student learning over time is not described, nor is how assessment will inform instruction.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
The multiple forms of assessment used across the unit are described somewhat and include either formative/summative or formal/informal assessments. Assessments are loosely connected to the theoretical framework, unit goals and objectives, and professional standards. How assessments will facilitate the scaffolding of student learning over time is unclear, as is how assessment will inform instruction.
(3) Basic Proficiency
The multiple forms of assessment used across the unit are sufficiently described and include formative, summative, formal, and informal assessments. Assessments are connected to the theoretical framework, unit goals and objectives, and professional standards. How assessments will facilitate the scaffolding of student learning over time is stated, as is how assessment will inform instruction.
(4) Outstanding Performance
The multiple forms of assessment used across the unit are described in detail and include formative, summative, formal, and informal assessments. Assessments are explicitly connected to the theoretical framework, unit goals and objectives, and professional standards. How assessments will facilitate the scaffolding of student learning over time is described in detail, as is how assessment will inform instruction.
UNIT 6 Pedagogy Describe the series of connected lessons and/or experiences in the unit. Include your detailed lesson plans for selected lessons in this section using the lesson plan format given to you. Describe in detail how you will scaffold and support student learning over time, and address any relevant safety considerations.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
The series of connected lessons and/or experiences in the unit are poorly described. Some lesson plans are included (with few relevant materials, e.g. rubrics, handouts, etc.) and are not consistent with the lesson plan format given. Strategies for scaffolding and supporting student learning over time are not mentioned, and relevant safety considerations are not addressed.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
The series of connected lessons and/or experiences in the unit are vaguely described. Selected lesson plans are included (with most relevant materials, e.g. rubrics, handouts, etc.) and are somewhat consistent with the lesson plan format given. Strategies for scaffolding and supporting student learning over time are unclear, and relevant safety considerations are minimally addressed.
(3) Basic Proficiency
The series of connected lessons and/or experiences in the unit are described. Sufficiently detailed lesson plans of selected lessons are included (with some relevant materials, e.g. rubrics, handouts, etc.) and are consistent with the lesson plan format given. Strategies for scaffolding and supporting student learning over time are described, and relevant safety considerations are addressed.
(4) Outstanding Performance
The series of connected lessons and/or experiences in the unit are thoroughly described. Detailed lesson plans of selected lessons are included (with all relevant materials, e.g. rubrics, handouts, etc.) and use the lesson plan format given. Strategies for scaffolding and supporting student learning over time are richly detailed, and relevant safety considerations are addressed.
UNIT 7 Unit Implementation Describe what happened when you implemented this unit, with particular attention to students' responses to its main activities. Reflect on what went well and what you would change in future implementations.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Unclear description of what happened when the unit was implemented, with little attention to students' responses to its main activities. Includes no reflection on what went well and what he/she would change in future implementations.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Some description of what happened when the unit was implemented, with particular attention to students' responses to its main activities. Includes some reflection on what went well and what he/she would change in future implementations.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Good description of what happened when the unit was implemented, with particular attention to students' responses to its main activities. Candidate reflected on what went well and what he/she would change in future implementations.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Clearly describes what happened when the unit was implemented, with particular attention to students' responses to its main activities. Candidate reflected in detail on what went well and what he/she would change in the future.
UNIT 8 Analysis of Student Learning Report the results of a systematic analysis of what your students learned as a result of the unit, making explicit references to goals and objectives, and using data from formal assessments and classroom observations (see number 5 above). Refer as appropriate to the assessment results and student work in an appendix to support your claims.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Analysis of student learning is absent and there is no reference to unit goals and objectives. There is little or no supporting evidence in student work.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Analysis of student learning is present but not systematic or complete and there is little reference to unit goals and objectives. Supporting evidence in student work is inconsistent.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Systematic analysis of student learning with sufficient reference to unit goals and objectives. Includes sufficient analysis of assessments that is supported by evidence in student work.
(4) Outstanding Performance
A thorough systematic analysis of student learning with explicit reference to unit goals and objectives. Includes clear and succinct analysis of multiple forms of assessment that is supported by evidence in student work.
UNIT 9 Unit Analysis This section is a detailed analysis of the implementation of the unit that brings together content, theory, and practice. Describe how you have integrated the components of the unit into a coherent whole that produces meaningful and relevant student learning and addresses the goals articulated in Part 2 and 3 of the rubric. Connect the unit implementation with the larger curriculum and theoretical framework described in the introduction.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Analysis of the implementation of the unit that brings together content, theory, and practice is not articulated. How the candidate integrated the components of the unit into a coherent whole that produces meaningful and relevant student learning is not described. Connections between the unit implementation and the larger curriculum and theoretical framework are not mentioned.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Analysis of the implementation of the unit that brings together content, theory, and practice is somewhat articulated. How the candidate integrated the components of the unit into a coherent whole that produces meaningful and relevant student learning is unclear. Connections between the unit implementation and the larger curriculum and theoretical framework are mentioned with some detail.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Analysis of the implementation of the unit that brings together content, theory, and practice is sufficiently articulated. How the candidate integrated the components of the unit into a coherent whole that produces meaningful and relevant student learning is described. Connections between the unit implementation and the larger curriculum and theoretical framework are adequately described.
(4) Outstanding Performance
A richly detailed analysis of the implementation of the unit that brings together content, theory, and practice is clearly articulated. How the candidate integrated the components of the unit into a coherent whole that produces meaningful and relevant student learning is thoroughly described. Connections between the unit implementation and the larger curriculum and theoretical framework are clearly described.
UNIT10 Appendix Include: 1) text of key assignments and assessments, including rubrics or handouts given to students; 2) aggregate assessment data; 3) samples of student work with your comments.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Few of the suggested items are included.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Most suggested items are included.
(3) Basic Proficiency
All suggested items are included.
(4) Outstanding Performance
All suggested items are included and some additional evidence added.
 
Part II - NCSS Standards for Social Studies teacher candidates
Based on the innovative unit submitted, please evaluate, with respect to each of the NCSS thematic standards that are relevant to the topic of the unit, the extent to which the candidate has demonstrated the desired level of proficiency in the each following areas:
A.  Candidate’s  content   knowledge   –  i.e.,  the  candidate  has  sufficient  background knowledge about the theme to inform effective planning and instruction.
B.  Candidate’s  planning   and   implementation  of  instruction  –  i.e.,  the  candidate possesses the capabilities and dispositions to organize and provide instruction about the theme in a way that is effective and appropriate to the students’ developmental level, background knowledge and culture.
C.  Candidate’s  assessment   of  student   learning   –  i.e.,  the  candidate  possesses  the
knowledge, capabilities and dispositions to monitor and assess student learning in ways that are consistent with identified instructional goals and strategies and mindful of students’ ability.
D.  Candidate’s effect on students’  learning  – i.e., the candidate’s teaching has increased students’ understanding, knowledge and interest about the theme.

To evaluate each of these dimensions, please use the following rubrics:

n/o: Not observable – the topic of the unit was not conducive to assessing this theme
1.   Insufficient   –  i.e.,  you  have evidence that  indicates that  the  candidate has  not  yet achieved the desired level of proficiency.
2.   Emergent/needs improvement – i.e., you have evidence that indicates that the candidate has only partially achieved the desired level of proficiency.
3.  Basic proficiency – i.e., you have evidence that indicates that the candidate has demonstrated the desired level of proficiency at least once.
4.  Outstanding proficiency – i.e., you have evidence that indicates that the candidate consistently demonstrates the desired level of proficiency.

NOTE: To arrive to this evaluation, you may want to refer to the more detailed explanations provided by NCSS for each specific standard (included in the “Social Studies Teacher Candidates Standards and Rubrics” document you received from the Warner School and at https://www.socialstudies.org/standards/caep/.

NCSS 1. 1 Culture and Cultural Diversity Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
NCSS1. 1a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge
NCSS1. 1b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 1c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 1d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 2 Time, Continuity, and Chang Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of time, continuity, and change.
NCSS1. 2a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 2b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 2c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 2d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 3 People, Places, and Environmen Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of people, places, and environment.
NCSS1. 3a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 3b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 3c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 3d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 4 Individual Development and Identity Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individual development and identity.
NCSS1. 4a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 4b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 4c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 4d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 5 Individuals, Groups and Institutions Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individuals, groups, and institutions.
NCSS1. 5a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 5b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 5c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 5d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 6 Power, Authority, and Governance Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of power, authority and governance.
NCSS1. 6a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 6b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 6c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 6d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 7 Production, Distribution, and Consumption Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and disposition to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.
NCSS1. 7a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 7b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 7c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 7d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 8 Science, Technology and Society Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of science, technology and society.
NCSS1. 8a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 8b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 8c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 8d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1. 9 Global Connections Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of global connections and interdependence.
NCSS1. 9a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 9b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 9c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1. 9d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning

NCSS 1.10 Civic Ideals and Practices Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of civic ideals and practices.
NCSS1.10a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1.10b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1.10c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
NCSS1.10d Student Learning Candidate's effect on student learning
 
Part III - Innovative Unit Rubrics: Warner proficiencies

Please evaluate the extent to which the unit plan and its implementation provides evidence that the candidate has achieved the following proficiencies set by the Warner School as targets for all teacher candidates, using the following rubrics:
1. Insufficient – i.e., this proficiency was not met.
2. Emergent/needs improvement –i.e., you found some evidence that the candidate demonstrated this proficiency, but it was only partial or inconsistent.
3. Basic proficiency – i.e., you found evidence that the candidate demonstrated this proficiency at the minimum acceptable level.
4. Outstanding performance – i.e., the unit provided an excellent example that the candidate has achieved proficiency in this area.
 
We realize that in some cases you may not have had the opportunity to gather pertinent information for all proficiencies listed below. Therefore, we have given the option, whenever appropriate, for you do indicate “n/o” (“not observed”) to clearly distinguish this situation from the one where you had the opportunity to observed relevant behavior and found it lacking. There are some proficiencies, however, for which this is not an option since your evaluation is critical to assessing the candidate on that particular dimension – as indicated by a lack of the “n/o” option.

Warner School 1 CONTENT PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches, as identified by relevant professional organizations, and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for all students.
WS 1.2 Subject matter understanding Candidates have a good understanding of some of the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structures of the subject matter(s) taught, and have developed strategies and skills to continue their learning in this area.
WS 1.3 Curriculum standards Candidates are familiar with the principles and concepts delineated in professional, New York State, and Warner School Teaching and Curriculum standards, and their implications for curricular and instructional decisions.
WS 1.4 Meaningful learning experiences Candidates are able to create learning experiences that make the subject matter meaningful and relevant for all students.

Warner School 2 LEARNING PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands how all children learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social and personal development. The teacher candidate understands that learning involves active engagement in culturally valued activities with knowledgeable others and the construction of new knowledge.
WS 2.2 Knowledge construction & culture Candidates understand that all students construct knowledge through active engagement in culturally valued activities, and know what is appropriate for their students to learn, based on their age/grade level and the strengths, experiences and resources of their family/community background
WS 2.3 Building on students' experiences Candidates are able to provide learning experiences that take into consideration the students' developmental level and draw on the strengths and resources available in students' prior experiences, as well as the school, family, and community contexts in which they live.

Warner School 3 EQUITY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. The teacher understands the role each of us plays in the maintenance and transformation of social and educational practices that engender inequity and is committed to promote equity and social justice.
WS 3.4 Culturally relevant learning experiences Candidates are able to provide learning experiences that are culturally relevant and address the strengths and needs of all students.

Warner School 4 PEDAGOGY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands the link between content and pedagogy. As such, the teacher candidate understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage all students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills that are appropriate for specific topics and subject areas, as identified by the relevant professional organization(s). The teacher candidate is able to use and problematize the various technologies available to facilitate learning.
WS 4.2 Using innovative strategies Candidates are able to use a variety of teaching and learning strategies and classroom structures to achieve the learning goals articulated in relevant professional, New York State and Warner School program standards.
WS 4.4 Use Technology Candidates are able to use technology in a variety of ways to support student learning within specific content areas.

Warner School 5 LEARNING COMMUNITY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation for all students.
WS 5.3 Foster community of learners Candidates are able to construct a classroom environment that supports student motivation and learning and the creation of a "community of learners."

Warner School 6 COMMUNICATION PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands the key role played by language in teaching and learning. The teacher candidate uses knowledge of effective verbal, non-verbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
WS 6.3 Uses communication to support learning Candidates are able to use effectively a variety of modes of communication to make ideas accessible to all students and foster inquiry.
WS 6.4 Use of varied media Candidates are able to construct curriculum activities that incorporate oral, written, visual, and electronic texts as tools for interaction and communication across multiple contexts, and that facilitate all students' critical analysis of such texts.

Warner School 7 PLANNING PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.
WS 7.1 Standards-based planning Candidates are able to align instruction with learning goals consistent with professional and New York State standards.
WS 7.2 Unit planning and implementation Candidates are able to implement lessons according to a well- defined and high quality plan.

Warner School 8 ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continual intellectual, social and physical development of all learners and to inform instruction. Assessment is embedded in authentic learning activities that are for real audiences and real purposes.
WS 8.2 Use appropriate assessments Candidates are able to use a variety of assessment and evaluation strategies, including some that are embedded in authentic learning activities and have real audiences and purposes, to monitor, assess and provide guidance to student learning.
WS 8.3 Using assessment inform instruction Candidates are able to use assessment to inform instruction by making links between their teaching and student performance and by adjusting their practice as a result of analysis of and reflection on student assessment data.
WS 8.4 Positive effect on students' learning Candidates are able to have a positive effect on their students' learning.

Warner School 9 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally, including staying up to date with research, theories and best practices in his/her field.
WS 9.2 Reflection on practice Candidates are able to reflect on their practices, constructively use critiques of their practice, and draw from theories and research results, in order to make necessary adjustments to enhance student learning.

Warner School 10 COMMUNITY PRINCIPLE The teacher candidate fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents/ caregivers, and agencies in the larger community to support students' learning and well-being.
WS10.1 Valuing community involvement Candidates value and seek out parental and community involvement.
 
Notes: