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University of Rochester Warner School of Education
Lesson Plan Assignment Social Studies
 
Candidate: Evaluator:
Semester and Year (required): Course #:
Date:
Description:
 
Please review the complete guidelines: https://www.warner.rochester.edu/files/assessment/LPguidelines.pdf.

Please included the following information in the Description:
·         Date
·         Cooperating teacher
·         Grade level
·         Subject area
·         Title of unit of which this lesson is a part
·         Lesson title
·         Duration of lesson
 
Definitions of Standard Lesson Plan Criteria:
Note: Differentiation, adaptations, accommodations, and/or modifications should be purposefully infused throughout the appropriate components of the lesson plan (e.g., assessments, procedures, resources, etc.)
 
Part I - Lesson Plan Rubric

Lesson Components 
LP 1 Content Area Candidates should (1) indicate the predominant content area to be addressed in the lesson, and (2) when applicable, how it will be connected to other content areas. Guiding questions: What are the predominant content areas you are addressing? How will you make connections to other content areas (curriculum integration)?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate does not identify a content area or it is not predominant in the lesson. Candidate makes no connections to other content areas.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate identifies the predominant content area of the lesson. Candidate makes vague and / or confusing connections to other content areas.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate identifies the predominant content area. Candidate makes broad and general connections to other content areas.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate identifies the predominant content area. Candidate articulates clear and detailed connections to other content areas.
LP 2 Purpose/Goals Candidates should describe: (1) what the students will learn as a result of their participation in the lesson, (2) why the goals of the lesson are important, and (3) the “big idea” that will help students connect the lesson to the world beyond the classroom. Guiding questions: What do you want your students to learn from this lesson? What is the goal of this lesson and why is it important? How are the lesson goals related to other ongoing areas of study? What is the “big idea” that has enduring value for students beyond the classroom, that assists all students with difficult ideas or misconceptions, and that engages them in meaningful learning?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate describes what students will learn from the lesson, but the explanation about why the goals are important, how they relate to other areas of study, and the "big idea" of the lesson are absent or not well articulated
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate articulates lesson goals and describes their importance, but goals are not related to other areas of study, or connections are unclear/confusing. Candidate identifies the "big idea," but it is unclear how he or she will use it to engage students in meaningful learning, or help them understand difficult ideas, or correct misinterpretations.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate articulates lesson goals, describes their importance, and briefly relates goals to other areas of study briefly mentioned. Candidate identifies the "big idea," but does not fully articulate how the lesson will engage students in meaningful learning, help them to understand difficult ideas, or correct misconceptions.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate clearly articulates lesson goals, describes their importance, and articulates their relationships to other areas of study. Candidate explains how the "big idea" of the lesson will engage students in meaningful learning, help them to understand difficult ideas, and correct misconceptions.
LP 3 Objectives Candidates should identify: (1) the specific objectives that they want their students to achieve, (2) briefly describe how they will demonstrate that they have achieved them, and (3) briefly describe how the goals/objectives for this lesson consider students' working towards accomplishing their IEP goals and objectives. Guiding questions: What specific objectives do you want your students to achieve? What will your students do to accomplish the goal/s of this lesson? (e.g., students will create a graphic organizer to …) How do the objectives/goals for this lesson consider students' working towards accomplishing their IEP goals and objectives?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate provides no objectives or are unclear or unrelated to standards, are inappropriate for the intended grade level, are not likely to be accomplished by most students in the time allotted, and do not address goals/objectives from IEPs.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate provides unclear objectives that have a weak relationship to the learning standards, but are appropriate for the intended grade level; however, it is unlikely that objectives will be accomplished by students in the time allotted. Candidate minimally addresses goals/objectives from IEPs and does not clearly articulate how lesson objectives are related to students' working toward accomplishing IEP goals / objectives.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate provides clear objectives, with some relationship to the learning standards that are mostly appropriate for the intended grade level, are likely to be accomplished by most of the students in the time allotted, and address goals / objectives from IEPs, with lesson objectives related to students' working toward accomplishing IEP goals/objectives.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate provides objectives that clearly describe how students will demonstrate what they have learned with a strong relationship to learning standards that are appropriate for the intended grade level, are likely to be accomplished by almost all students in the time allotted, and fully address goals/objectives from IEPs, with lesson objectives clearly related to students' working toward accomplishing IEP goals/objectives.
LP 4 National and/or NYS Standards Candidates should identify the specific national (professional organization) and NYS standards or performance indicators they will address in the lesson. This section should be written as a narrative, and should not be presented as a list of standards. Guiding questions: What are the specific national (professional organization) and/or state standards, key ideas, performance indicators, and major understandings that you will address in this lesson? Explain how this lesson meets these standards in a brief narrative.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate does not address or inappropriately addresses specific national and/or State standards and does not connect them to the objectives of the lesson.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate addresses national and/or NYS standards and performance indicators in general terms, but does not explain the relationship between the standards and the objectives.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate addresses specific national and/or NYS standards and performance indicators in the lesson, but does not provide the explanation of their relationship to the objectives in a list, not a narrative.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate clearly identifies specific national and/or NYS standards and performance indicators in the lesson, and explains their relationship to objectives in a narrative.
LP 5 Assessment Candidates should describe: (1) the methods and strategies they will use to measure student learning throughout the lesson and at its conclusion, (2) what will count as “evidence” of learning, (3) the ways that the assessment in the lesson is connected to more summative assessments, (4) how the assessment in this lesson will inform instruction on an ongoing basis, and (5) the ways that the assessment will be differentiated, adapted, accommodated, and/or modified to meet the diverse learning needs of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels. Guiding questions: Summative: How will you know students have learned what you wanted them to learn, that the objectives have been accomplished, and that the goals have been achieved? What will count as evidence of learning? How does this summative assessment of the lesson link to your summative unit and/or curriculum assessments? Formative: How will your assessment inform instruction on an ongoing basis? How will you assess in the process of student learning throughout the lesson and how will you make adjustments? Contextualize the response to this question to include possible scenarios that could take place during the lesson.
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate selects assessment strategies that are unrelated to objectives and/or standards of the lesson and that are inappropriate and are not adjusted / differentiated for varying learning styles and strengths.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate selects assessment methods and strategies that are minimally appropriate or somewhat adjusted / differentiated for varying learning styles and strengths, but only at the conclusion of the lesson; candidate identifies minimal or unclear examples of evidence of student learning. Candidate does not make or makes unclear connections between the formative and summative assessments and provides no ideas about how the lesson assessments will inform instruction on an ongoing basis.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate select assessment methods and strategies that are appropriate, but do not meet the needs of all students and focus on a limited number of learning styles and strengths; candidate identifies several examples of evidence of student learning. Candidate makes vague or undeveloped connections between the formative and summative assessments and provides some ideas about how the lesson assessments will inform instruction on an ongoing basis.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate clearly articulates assessment methods and strategies that are differentiated to allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills according to their varying learning styles and strengths; candidate clearly articulates what is considered evidence of learning. Candidate clearly articulates connections between the formative and summative assessments and provides ideas about how the lesson assessments will inform instruction on an ongoing basis.
LP 6 Community Knowledge and Experience Candidates should describe: (1) how they will account for, or incorporate students' knowledge and experiences in the lesson, (2) how they will ensure that English Language Learners and students with disability labels are fully included members of the learning community, and (3) how their knowledge and experiences will be shared or included in the learning process so that they are engaged with their students as a member of the learning community. Guiding questions: How will you help the students make connections to what they know and have experienced? How will you bring students' experiences and knowledge into this lesson? How will you use students' knowledge and experiences as resources for this lesson (and for your curriculum more generally)? How will you ensure that all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels are fully included members of the learning community? How will you connect your own personal and professional knowledge to the lesson so you are included as a member of the learning community?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate does not identify or identifies vague strategies for recognizing and incorporating students' knowledge and experiences into the lesson; candidate does not articulate the ways in which he or she is a member of the classroom community and will integrate his or her knowledge and experience into the lesson. Candidate does not indicate how all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels, will be fully included members of the learning community.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate describes strategies for recognizing and incorporating students' knowledge and experiences in the lesson; candidate does not clearly articulate the ways in which he or she is a member of the classroom community and will integrate his or her knowledge into the lesson. Candidate plans for student participation, but it is not clear how the candidate will ensure that all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels, are fully included members of the learning community.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate describes strategies for recognizing and incorporating students' knowledge and experiences in the lesson; candidate articulates the ways in which he or she is a member of the classroom community and describes strategies/ideas for integrating his or her knowledge and experience into the lesson. Candidate plans for student participation, and ensures that all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels, are included members of the learning community.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate clearly articulates strategies for the recognition and incorporation of students' knowledge and experiences in the lesson; candidate clearly articulates what it means to be a member of the classroom community and specific ways in which his or her knowledge and experience will be shared and included in the lesson. The candidate ensures that all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels, are fully and meaningfully included members of the learning community.
LP 7 Procedure Candidates should describe: (1) how the lesson will begin, (2) the activities that will help students to achieve the learning objectives of the lesson, (3) the duration of each of the main components of the lesson, (4) how transitions will be made between the major components of the lesson, (4) strategies for altering the procedure if the lesson does not go as planned, and (5) how they will conclude the lesson. Guiding questions: How will you begin this lesson? What activities will help achieve your goal/s and objectives? How will you organize these activities? How long will each of the main components of the lesson last? How will you hand transitions within the lesson? Are your activities and strategies differentiated through multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement that reflect high, appropriate expectations for all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels? Are accommodations and/or modifications indicated on IEPs incorporated into the lesson? What back up plan do you have if the lesson does not go as you expect? How will you end the lesson?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate provides an unclear or confusing description of the progression of the lesson, including transitions. Candidate plans lesson activities that are not likely to help students achieve the objectives of the lesson. Candidate does not identify or identifies inappropriate strategies to alter the lesson if it does not go as planned.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate describes all lesson activities, but the lesson progression, including transitions, is somewhat unclear. Candidate plans some activities that are not likely to help students achieve the objectives of the lesson. Candidate does not identify strategies to alter the lesson if it does not go as planned or the strategies are not likely to be effective
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate describes all activities, and lesson progression, including transitions. Candidate plans activities that explain how the students will achieve the objectives of the lesson. Candidate identifies a few strategies to alter the lesson if it does not go as planned, some of which are not likely to be effective.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate clearly articulates how the lesson will begin and end and the transitions between major components of the lesson. Candidate plans activities that clearly explain how the students will achieve the objectives of the lesson. The candidate identifies potentially effective strategies to alter the lesson if it does not go as planned.
LP 8 Differentiated Instruction Candidates should describe: (1) how activities and strategies will be differentiated through multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement that reflect high, appropriate expectations for all students, including English Language Learners and students with disabilities, (2) how activities and strategies enhance students' verbal, writing, and content area vocabulary skills, and (3) how accommodations and/or modifications indicated on IEP are incorporated into the lesson. Guiding questions: How are your activities and strategies differentiated through multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement that reflect high, appropriate expectations for all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels? How do the activities and strategies enhance students' verbal, written, and content area vocabulary skills? How does this lesson engage and interest students, offer appropriate challenges, and increase motivation, self-reliance, self-control, and self-esteem? Does this lesson incorporate accommodations and/or modifications indicated on students' IEPs?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate designs activities and strategies that do not address students' varying learning styles and strengths and do not incorporate multiple means of representation, expression, or engagement that interest students, offer appropriate challenges, increase motivation, self-reliance, self-control, and self-esteem. Candidate does not incorporate adaptations, accommodations, and/or modifications for students with exceptionalities or ELLs and does not incorporate accommodations and/or modifications indicated on IEPs.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate designs activities and strategies that minimally address students' varying learning styles and strengths and incorporate at least one of the following: multiple means of representation, expression, or engagement that interest students, offer appropriate challenges, increase motivation, self-reliance, self-control, and self-esteem. Candidate incorporates adaptations, accommodations, and/or modifications that are not clearly linked to specific student learning needs and incorporate some accommodations and/or modifications indicated on IEPs.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate designs activities and strategies that address students' varying learning styles and strengths and incorporate at least two of the following: multiple means of representation, expression, or engagement that interest students, offer appropriate challenges, increase motivation, self-reliance, self-control, and self-esteem. Candidate incorporates adaptations, accommodations, and/or modifications that are somewhat linked to specific student learning needs and incorporate most accommodations and/or modifications indicated on IEPs.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate designs activities and strategies that thoroughly address students' varying learning styles and strengths and incorporate all of the following: multiple means of representation, expression, or engagement that interest students, offer appropriate challenges, increase motivation, self-reliance, self-control, and self-esteem. Candidate incorporates adaptations, accommodations, and/or modifications that are clearly linked to specific student learning needs and incorporate all accommodations and/or modifications indicated on IEPs.
LP 9 Resources Candidates should: (1) list the human and material resources (including technology and assistive technology) they will need to conduct the lesson, (3) describe how these will be used to enhance learning, (4) how resources will be differentiated, adapted, accommodated, and/or modified to meet the diverse learning needs, including the need for assistive technology for communication, of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels, and (5) when applicable, how they will be distributed. Guiding questions: What materials/resources will you need? Have you considered the assistive technology needs of students? How will materials/resources be differentiated, adapted, accommodated, and/or modified to meet the diverse learning needs, including the need for assistive technology for communication, of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels? How will you distribute the resources?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate does not identify or identifies supporting materials unrelated or irrelevant to the purposes of the lesson and/or student engagement / participation. Candidate does not differentiate, adapt, accommodate, and/or modify resources to meet the diverse learning needs of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels. Candidate does not describe how resources will be used or distributed or suggests strategies that are likely to result in chaos.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate identifies supporting human and material resources with minimal relevance to the lesson, student engagement / participation, and that are not critical or are unnecessary / unlikely to enhance student learning. Candidate minimally differentiates, adapts, accommodates, and/or modifies resources to meet the diverse learning needs of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels. Candidate does not describe how resources will be used or, when applicable, how they will be distributed.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate identifies supporting human and material resources likely to enhance learning and articulates their relevance to student engagement / participation is articulated. Candidate differentiates, adapts, accommodates, and/or modifies most resources to meet the diverse learning needs of some students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels. Candidate briefly describes how resources will be used to enhance learning and, when applicable, how they will be distributed
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate identifies supporting human and material resources likely to enhance learning significantly and articulates their relevance to student engagement / participation is articulated. Candidate differentiates, adapts, accommodates, and/or modifies all resources to meet the diverse learning needs of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels. Candidate has clearly articulates how resources will be used to enhance learning and, when applicable, how they will be distributed.
LP10 Applications, Connections, Extensions Candidates should describe how they would help students to apply what they have learned, make connections to other topics, concepts, or ideas, and extend their learning beyond the lesson. Guiding questions: How will you follow up what was learned in future lessons? How will you assist students in making connections between what they learn in this lesson to other lessons or to larger issues beyond the classroom?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate does not articulate how the lesson will help students apply, connect or extend their learning or articulates this poorly or in a confusing manner.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate describe how she or he will help students apply what they have learned in the lesson; however, suggestions do not make connections between the lesson and other topics, concepts or ideas, and are not likely to extend student learning beyond the classroom.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate describes how she or he will help students apply what they have learned in the lesson and some of the ideas are designed to help students make connections between the lesson and other topics, concepts or ideas and extend their learning beyond the classroom.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate articulates creative and thoughtful ideas for how she or he will help students apply what they have learned in the lesson and most of the ideas will help students make connections between the lesson and other topics, concepts or ideas and extend their learning beyond the classroom.
LP11 Personal Reflection Candidates should describe and reflect on: (1) how the lesson is inclusive of all students' strengths and abilities, and (2) how it will address the diversity characteristics most relevant to their classroom population, including English language ability, hearing, sight and mobility impairments, social and cultural norms and traditions, sexual orientation, academic ability, and so on. Candidate should provide context for the instructional choices made in the lesson plan to specifically address consideration of, among other, students' IEPs and collaboration with related services professionals and ESL teachers. Guiding questions: How is this lesson inclusive of all students' abilities and capabilities? How did you design instruction to meet the strengths/needs of a heterogeneous group of students (e.g., social, cultural, linguistic, ability, etc. differences)? This section should be a narrative that provides context for the instructional choices made in the lesson plan that specifically addresses consideration of, among other things, students' IEPs and collaboration with related services professionals and ESL teachers. In cases where the lesson has been taught, candidates should reflect on: (1) their ability to construct a meaningful learning community, (2) the strengths and limitations of the lesson, (3) the strategies for how the lesson could be revised in the future, (4) whether they are confident that they met the instructional, emotional, and social needs of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels, and (5) any insights they gained about their students and themselves as individuals or professionals as a result of the lesson. Guiding questions: What went well? What would you change? What did you learn about the students? What did you learn about yourself? How confident are you that you met the instructional, emotional, and social needs of all students, including English Language Learners and students with disability labels? How did you construct a meaningful learning community?
(1)Unacceptable / Insufficient
Candidate does not describe how she or he considered, among other things, students' IEPs and collaboration with related services professionals and ESL teachers in making instructional choices. Candidate describes how the lesson addresses student diversity and the inclusion of all students. In cases where the lesson has been taught, the candidate has not demonstrated the ability to reflect on the lesson, and is unable to identify strengths and limitations or insights about the things she/he has learned about his/her students and himself/herself, including whether she/he is confident that she/he met the instructional, emotional, and social needs of all students.
(2) Needs Improvement / Emerging
Candidate minimally describes how she/he considered, among other things, students' IEPs and collaboration with related services professionals and ESL teachers in making instructional choices. Candidate describes how the lesson addresses student diversity, but activities/strategies to the support the inclusion of all students are not apparent in the lesson. In cases where the lesson has been taught, the candidate has demonstrated the ability to reflect on the lesson, has identified the strengths and limitations of the lesson, but has not offered ideas about how it could be revised in the future. Candidate broadly and vaguely identifies some the things she/he learned about his/her students and himself/herself, including whether she/he is confident she/he met the instructional, emotional, and social needs of students.
(3) Basic Proficiency
Candidate describes how she/he considered, among other things, students' IEPs and collaboration with related services professionals and ESL teachers in making instructional choices. Candidate describes how the lesson addresses student diversity, and most activities/strategies support the inclusion of all students. In cases where the lesson has been taught, the candidate has demonstrated the ability to reflect on the lesson, has identified the strengths and limitations of the lesson, and offers some general ideas about how it could be revised in the future. Candidate identifies insights she/he has learned about his/her students and himself/herself, including whether she/he is confident that she/he met the instructional, emotional, and social needs of all students.
(4) Outstanding Performance
Candidate describes how she/he considered, among other things, students' IEPs and collaboration with related services professionals and ESL teachers in making instructional choices. Candidate thoughtfully and comprehensively describes how the lesson addresses student diversity, and all activities/strategies support the inclusion of all students. In cases where the lesson has been taught, the candidate has demonstrated her/his ability to reflect on the lesson, has clearly identified the strengths and limitations of the lesson, and has made suggestions for how it could be revised in the future. Candidate thoughtfully and thoroughly identifies insights she/he has learned about his/her students and himself/herself including whether they are confident that they met the instructional, emotional, and social needs of all students.
 
Part II - LP - NCSS Standards for Social Studies teacher candidates
Based on the lesson plan submitted, please evaluate, with respect to each of the NCSS thematic standards that are relevant to the topic of the lesson, the extent to which the candidate has demonstrated the desired level of proficiency in the each following areas:
A.  Candidate’s content knowledge – i.e., the candidate has sufficient background knowledge about the theme to inform effective planning and instruction.
B.  Candidate’s planning  and  implementation of instruction – i.e., the candidate possesses the capabilities and dispositions to organize and provide instruction about the theme in a way that is effective  and  appropriate  to  the  students’  developmental level,  background  knowledge  and culture.
C.  Candidate’s assessment of student  learning  – i.e., the candidate possesses the knowledge, capabilities and dispositions to monitor and assess student learning in ways that are consistent with identified instructional goals and strategies and mindful of students’ ability.

To evaluate each of these dimensions, please use the following rubrics:

n/o: Not observable – the topic of the lesson was not conducive to addressing this theme
1.   Insufficient  – i.e., you have evidence that indicates that the candidate has not yet achieved the desired level of proficiency.
2.   Emergent/needs improvement – i.e., you have evidence that indicates that the candidate has only partially achieved the desired level of proficiency.
3.   Basic proficiency– i.e., you have evidence that indicates that the candidate has demonstrated the desired level of proficiency at least once.
4.   Outstanding proficiency  – i.e., you have evidence that indicates that the candidate consistently demonstrates the desired level of proficiency.

NOTE: To arrive to this evaluation, you may want to refer to the more detailed explanations provided by NCSS for each specific standard (included in the “Social Studies Teacher Candidates Standards and Rubrics” document you received from the Warner School and also available at https://www.socialstudies.org/standards/caep/.

NCSS 1. 1 Culture and Cultural Diversity Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
NCSS1. 1a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge
NCSS1. 1b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 1c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 2 Time, Continuity, and Chang Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of time, continuity, and change.
NCSS1. 2a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 2b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 2c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 3 People, Places, and Environmen Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of people, places, and environment.
NCSS1. 3a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 3b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 3c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 4 Individual Development and Identity Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individual development and identity.
NCSS1. 4a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 4b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 4c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 5 Individuals, Groups and Institutions Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individuals, groups, and institutions.
NCSS1. 5a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 5b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 5c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 6 Power, Authority, and Governance Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of power, authority and governance.
NCSS1. 6a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 6b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 6c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 7 Production, Distribution, and Consumption Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and disposition to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.
NCSS1. 7a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 7b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 7c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 8 Science, Technology and Society Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of science, technology and society.
NCSS1. 8a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 8b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 8c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1. 9 Global Connections Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of global connections and interdependence.
NCSS1. 9a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1. 9b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1. 9c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning

NCSS 1.10 Civic Ideals and Practices Candidates in social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of civic ideals and practices.
NCSS1.10a Content knowledge Candidate's content knowledge.
NCSS1.10b Planning & Implementation Candidate's planning and implementation of instruction.
NCSS1.10c Assessment Candidate's assessment of student learning
 
Notes: