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8/29/2008

Luehmann Publishes Study on Teachers' Use of Blogging in The Journal of Learning Sciences

 April Luehmann, assistant professor of teaching and curriculum at the Warner School of Education, is author of a new article, “Using Blogging in Support of Teacher Professional Identity Development: A Case Study,” that appeared in The Journal of Learning Sciences, a high-impact journal in education.

 The article, which appears in the July 2008 issue, explores the affordances blogging can offer teachers to promote professional identity development when used to write about their work, experiences, opinions, and questions. Over a one-year school period and 316 blog posts, Luehmann takes a closer look at an urban science teacher’s use of blogging to reflect on her own professional practice and engage with a professional community.

 “Teachers are blogging in a number of different ways; however, little research been done to understand the details of how and why,” said Luehmann, who focuses her research on the design and use of new media literacies. “While this study empirically supports the potential of blogging for teachers’ professional identity development, it also develops some implications for teacher educators interested in capitalizing on the potential of blogging and determines the extent of the benefits they can derive from this practice.”

 By using her blog to tell stories about herself and her classroom, reflect on her practice, work through dilemmas, solicit feedback, and display competence, the urban science teacher in Luehmann’s study was able to wrestle with many issues that are central to the practice of urban science teaching and be recognized by herself and others as a “reform-minded” teacher committed to excellence and equity in education.

 For more information or to read Luehmann’s study on blogging, visit http://prod.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a795286605~db=all~order=page.

Tags: April Luehmann, research, science education